Greenpoint

Tues 3/21 at Mothership NYC: South African Visual Artist Diane Victor

2nd Tuesdays at Mothership NYC are informal, salon-style gatherings for artists, friends, and colleagues welcoming improvised presentations over wine and popcorn. All are welcome to sing, play, perform, or showcase!

Founded in 2005 by visual artist Sol Kjøk, Mothership NYC is a live-work space and presentation arena for international artists across multiple disciplines.

This month’s 2nd Tuesday (which will be held on Tuesday the 21st due to this week’s snowstorm) keynote presenter will be Mothership NYC’s current artist-in-residence, South African visual artist Diane Victor who will give a presentation about her ongoing project: ephemeral portraits drawn with the soot from a candle.

2nd Tuesdays at Mothership NYC
Tuesday, March 21st (rescheduled after the storm)

7:30pm | Facebook Event

Mothership NYC | 252 Green Street

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$15 Pizza + Wine Happy Hour at 21 Greenpoint

Image: 21 Greenpoint/Instagram

$1 oysters, $5 beers, 2-for-1 cake slices, these are just some of the great happy hour deals we can find in North Brooklyn, each making the end of the day a little bit brighter. And now you can add 21 Greenpoint’s $15 pizza special to the list. This isn’t any old pizza, though, it’s star-shaped because really, we all deserve a star for making it this far. Continue reading

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Just In Time For St. Patrick’s Day – A History of the Irish in Greenpoint!

On Friday everyone becomes Irish for a day—at least in the local bars, but Greenpoint actually has a long and colorful Irish history. The first Irish came to Greenpoint way back in the 1850s. Like many of the others who arrived here then, the Irish were lured by jobs in the booming shipbuilding business. An 1855 Greenpoint census revealed that about thirty percent of the locals were Irish born. Other Irish soon followed to work in the many factories and refineries that sprung up locally after the Civil War.

In 1864 Captain James McAllister, from County Antrim, Northern Ireland, started his maritime transport company with a single sail lighter, but it was the perfect time and place to open such a business. McAllister soon got more work than he could handle transporting the oil of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil. He brought over many of his family and neighbors from his hometown Cushendall, Co. Antrim and many of the present day Irish families in Greenpoint have Cushendall roots. Quickly the Irish dominated the waterfront and worked the many nautical and longshoremen jobs along the bustling East River and Newtown Creek shorelines. One of these Irish-American longshoremen was the colorful Pete McGuinness, “The King of Greenpoint,” for whom McGuinness Boulevard is named. He later entered politics and ran the area as the last old style Irish ward boss until his death in 1948. Continue reading

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New American Meets Hungarian Flavors At Palinkerie’s Furmint Wine Dinner This Thursday (3/16)!

Greenpoint-based importer of the finest Hungarian Wines, Palinkerie has teamed up with a local favorite Cherry Point (664 Manhattan Ave) to host their annual Furmint Wine Dinner this Thursday (3/16, 7PM)!

Four courses, three Furmints, three Hungarian winemakers:

Winter Citrus Salad with Lardo and Pecorino paired with St. Donát Márga Furmint 2015 (presented by Tamás Kovács, Winemaker, St. Donat Winery)

Housemade Charcuterie and Farmstead Cheese paired with Barta Öreg Király Dűlő Furmint 2013 (presented by Előd Ádám, Export Manager, Barta Winery)

 

choice of:
Lamb Offal Pie with Whipped Bone Marrow and Sauce Bordelaise or
Monkfish with Grilled Rice, Pickled Clams and Oyster Broth paired with Somlói Vándor Somlói Furmint 2015 (presented by Tamás Kis, Winemaker, Somlói Vándor)

Dessert: Spiced Biscotti

$80 per person. RSVP: [email protected] or 718-389-3828. Questions, comments, whatever: email [email protected].

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Women’s History Month: Mae West, Feminist and Progressive

Mae West, via Wikipedia

A lot of people know that movie star Mae West was born in 1893 on Herbert Street and that she became a and one of Hollywood’s first sex symbols, but a lot of people do not know that she was an outspoken feminist and a social progressive who successfully challenged bigotry and narrow-minded conventional morality.

West grew up at a time when women’s social roles were changing. She explained, “I was born just at the right time. A little earlier and they would have put a scarlet letter on me and burned me at the stake. A little later and they wouldn’t have been shocked any more.” West came of age at a time when vaudeville was America’s most popular form of entertainment, and Greenpoint had seven vaudeville theaters. West had little formal schooling, but her huge exposure to vaudeville theater shaped many of her avant garde ideas. In a day when most whites were prejudiced, her favorite male vaudeville actor was African American Bert Williams, from whom she took many of the aspects of her stage persona. She copied Williams’s uses of double entendres, innuendo and answers with multiple and conflicting messages where rebelliousness hid just below the surface. Later, when she directed plays, she insisted on racially integrated casts.
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A History of Greenpoint in 25 Buildings: St. Anthony of Padua Church

St Anthony's, illustration by Sara Harvey
St Anthony’s, illustration by Sara Harvey

For many Greenpointers there is no more iconic local image than the façade of St. Anthony of Padua church on Manhattan Avenue at Milton Street. The 240-foot-high church steeple is a landmark and the church is angled in so that it commands a sweeping vista of Milton Street. It is one of the most elegant churches in all of Brooklyn, and was built by one of the most prolific church architects in American history, Patrick Keely of Ireland, who designed at least six hundred other churches around North America—but few with the simple elegance of St. Anthony. Many say that the church on Manhattan Avenue is, in fact, his finest creation.
The Manhattan Avenue structure is not the first St. Anthony of Padua. The original church was built on India Street in 1858, but it proved too small for the mushrooming Catholic population and the famous Bishop Loughlin sought to buy a site to construct a much larger church. In 1865 Samuel Tilden sold five lots along Manhattan Avenue to the Catholic Church, generously charging the church for only one lot, even though Tilden was not a Catholic. The church acquired more land on Leonard Street in 1873 and in the same year the cornerstone was laid. Continue reading

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Obsessed With Sriracha? Tonight’s Talk At MOFAD Is For You!

If you’re a fan of Sriracha (or soy sauce, or curry), you shouldn’t miss tonight’s talk at MOFAD (62 Bayard St.) from 6-8pm.

Via MOFAD:
“Historic gastronomist and author of Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine, Sarah Lohman explores the global flavors that make up American cuisine. Join us to learn how soy sauce, curry, and Sriracha became part of everyday dining. How have these three distinct flavors come to represent Asian food in the US? And what do they reveal about how we define “ethnic” cuisine? Book sales and signing to follow.”

Get $10 tickets here

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The Unlikely Story of The White Greenpoint Woman Who Co-Founded America’s Most Influential Black Political Organization

Sometimes an unexpected event is a turning point in a person’s life. The story of Mary White Ovington’s trip to Prospect Park was just such a turning point. Ovington was born in 1865, just at the end of the Civil War in Brooklyn Heights. Her defining characteristic was idealism, which she inherited from her parents, who had been upper class Brooklyn abolitionists and taught Mary to fight for social justice. Ovington attended Packer Collegiate Institute, and then went on to Radcliffe, where she was greatly influenced by the ideas of professor William J. Ashley who convinced her to dedicate her life to helping the underprivileged.

Ovington worked for social justice, instead of marrying and raising a family. Ironically, despite the fact that her parents were abolitionists, initially, her work did not focus on African-Americans. Deeply influenced by the ideas of Jane Addams and her charitable Chicago Hull House settlement house, which sought to help the millions of uneducated immigrants, living in dirty, overcrowded tenements, White dedicated herself to aiding poor immigrants. She soon met the millionaire oil refiner Charles Pratt, who built the Astral Building on Franklin Street as affordable model housing for our area’s poor. A vital part of this building was the settlement house, which taught local immigrants important urban survival skills. Ovington impressed Pratt greatly, and he chose her as co-founder of his Greenpoint Settlement House. For four years she taught the immigrant poor of Greenpoint the skills they needed to succeed in New York.

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