Art/Music

LoftOpera revives “Otello,” Rossini’s Seldom Produced but Timely Masterpiece

Cecilia Violetta López as Desdemona and Bernard Holcomb as the titular Otello. Photo by Jamie Santamour.

LoftOpera never shies away from its edgy adaptations. In its upcoming production of Rossini’s Otello—based on Shakespeare’s tragedy of the same name—the challenge lies not in an overt modernization but in the score’s groundbreaking and complex music, and in the fact that this opera has not been produced in New York in more than 40 years. Loft’s reimagining of the classic tale of otherizing and political upheaval—themes still grappled with today—will play at LightSpace Studios (1115 Flushing Avenue) from March 16–27. We had the chance to speak to four-time Loft director John de los Santos and conductor Sean Kelly, a specialist in the bel canto technique.

GP: How have rehearsals been going?

JdlS: It’s an incredibly challenging piece but I’m very lucky to have Sean, the cast, and the incredible musicians, so it’s been going well.

SK: No one has sung this opera before, so it’s new for everyone, which is exciting. The Otello (Bernard Holcomb) we’ve technically been working with since September/October to prepare musically for the role.

GP: Rossini’s Otello has not been seen in New York in decades. Why this piece now?

JdlS: The last piece Sean and I did for Loft was Rossini’s Le Comte Ory and we had a great success with that, so it’s great to be working on one of his tragedies. This piece was an evolvement for him in his music as he was trying out some new things and really trying to push his audiences to accept and deal with topics that were pretty controversial in this period. Everybody’s familiar with the Verdi version of Otello and this one’s 70 years older. I think this version is superior; there are several things he does better than Verdi. Continue reading

Category: Art/Music, Culture, Events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

March Music Madness!

We’re so close to Spring (or at least have had our fair share of trickster spring weather), and people are starting to come out of hibernation and onto the streets, amped up to see live music. This month brings us some fantastic options every single night. Here are our top music picks for every day we have left in March! Get your tickets now, before this stuff sells out.

Reverend Vince Anderson & His Love Choir, photo via Facebook
Reverend Vince Anderson & His Love Choir, photo via Facebook

Monday, March 6th
Reverend Vince Anderson & His Love Choir
If you’ve never seen Reverend Vince, it’s a sweaty soulful bluesy danceathon that will turn anyone into a believer.
Union Pool, 484 Union Ave. | 10:30pm, info here

Tuesday, March 7th
Buke & Gase Improv Residency
Don’t miss out on this experimental indie rock series from Brooklyn duo Buke & Gase. This particular show will feature Yuka Honda of Cibo Matto as their special guest!
Union Pool, 484 Union Ave. | 8pm, $10-12 tickets Continue reading

Category: Art/Music | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Review: London Grammar At Good Room (3/2)

London Grammar at Good Room. All photos by Dylan Lappin

In January 2015, I became obsessed with London Grammar‘s debut album, If You Wait. I can’t recall which single I heard first, or how, but whatever that entry point was, it led to listening to the album on repeat, attempting to do any justice singing along with Hannah Reid’s infectious vocals as I volleyed from track to track: oh this is my favorite, for sure … no, wait, but this one! Was it the vulnerable Nightcall or the reflective Strong that compelled me more? The intriguing lead-off track Hey Now, the subsequent Stay Awake with its gorgeous melody and driving rhythm, or the soul-bearing title track that left me on a high and drew me in for more and more with each listen?  Continue reading

Category: Art/Music | Tags: , , , , | 0 Comments

Job Fair TODAY (3/4) for New Music Venue Brooklyn Steel!

Brooklyn Steel Job Fair

Today at the Cooper Park Community Center Gym (76 Kingsland Ave) new music venue Brooklyn Steel is holding a job fair. They’re hiring for Box Office, Bathroom Attendants, Coat Check, Door Staff, Hospitality, Maintenance, Merch, Production, Bartenders, Barbacks & Security positions.

Interviews will be taking place from 9am-4:30pm on a first come, first serve basis. They’ll be opening in April at 319 Frost Street, with some really cool shows planned—The Decemberists, PJ Harvey, Goldfrapp, Tycho, Two Door Cinema Club, among others.

Category: Art/Music, News | Tags: , , , , , | 0 Comments

Weekend Art Roundup: March 3 – March 7

A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, 2017 – Photo: Andy P. Smith

With all those damn art fairs in Manhattan this weekend, don’t forget about your local, North Brooklyn galleries and outposts! Here’s a couple receptions and a couple screenings happening around town, starting tonight.

Also, it’s only a week until Bushwick Galleries Late Night.

But first, here’s this weekend’s Art Roundup!

 

Arlene Morris “STITCHED”
Friday, March 3rd
7-9pm
at FigureWorks
168 N.6th St.

This new series uses handmade Kozo paper with embedded chips of Maine mica, created by neighboring artist Richard Lee. Arlene has molded, stitched, painted and stained the paper to create these spectacular reliefs. The work is personal and haunting. The figures, seemingly delicate and innocent hold dark secrets that is often revealed through hand stitched text.

And this exhibition marks the first in FigurewWorks’ new home, same address, just one flight down. “This work is a perfect compliment to Figureworks new exhibition space – each historically reflecting on the past while recreating a striking new future.”

 

Japanese Emerging Artists Exhibition, Armory Night Video Screening
Saturday, March 4th
7–10 p.m
at Williamsburg Art & Historical (WAH) Center
135 Broadway

As part of JART7th, an ongoing annual exhibition curated and produced by Hiro Shiraishi of Pepper Project, a Tokyo-based art group, aiming to introduce a new wave of young emerging Japanese artists from Tokyo in collaboration with the New York Japanese artists, as well as artists from Stockholm and Berlin, bridging these metropolises and their respective art worlds and linking these geographically disparate artists together in one show.

This Saturday’s screening features three experimental videos by Mami Kosemura, Jun Ando, Om Meguro Akiyoshi. Artist discussion to follow the screenings.

 

Alex Chowaniec: Gloria Patria (Burnt Eclipse)
Saturday, March 4
6–8pm
at New York Studio Factory, 2nd Floor Studio Gallery
2 St. Nicholas Avenue

w/ Musical Performance by Ev
Sponsored by Braven Brewing Company

After party at Artichoke Basille, 8pm ’till.

NYSF is excited to present Alex Chowaniec: Gloria Patria (Burnt Eclipse), a solo pop-up installation, with musical performance by Ev, during Armory Arts Week, in Bushwick.

Chowaniec’s Gloria Patria (Burnt Eclipse) installation is realized through progressive light, as darkness falls at sunset. The image comes to you slowly; in darkness there is discovery.

The democratization of access to art is critical. Chowaniec’s goal is to expand how we achieve this, working in hybrid media (traditional and new) with the conscious goal of creating multiple access points for viewer engagement. Alternative spaces provide a vehicle to change the way we make art, engage with art and reach out to community through flexible sites for exhibition, education and organizing.

 

Four Films by Richard P. Rogers
Tuesday, March 7
7:30pm
at Light Industries
155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
Tickets – $8

Richard P. Rogers (1944–2001) maintained two full-time careers: he was a celebrated director and producer of nonfiction films as well as an inspired teacher of still photography and filmmaking at Harvard. Rogers’s appetite for knowledge was omnivorous, taking him from the jungles of Nicaragua to the fountains of Rome, from the bedrooms of colonial New England homes to the streets of working-class Albany. Throughout these travels, his unsparing artist’s eye turned as often back onto himself—touching on a range of topics from art and architecture to history and literature, his films spoke in many voices, politically engaged but also personal and experimental. Though perhaps best known for the long form independent documentaries Living at Risk and Pictures from a Revolution (both collaborations with Susan Meiselas and Alfred Guzzetti), at Harvard he was also a mentor to new generations of committed filmmakers, and under his directorship the Film Study Center became an important catalyst for nonfiction production.

Presented by Jeremy Rossen, the Assistant Curator at the Harvard Film Archive, this event features four films by Rogers, followed by a conversation with Jeremy Rossen, and Roggers’ collaborators Susan Meiselas, and Alexander Olch.

 

See you in the streets!

Category: Art/Music, Culture, Events, Film | Tags: , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Thursday Spotlight: Joelle Te Paske – Social Change Through Art

Joelle Te Paske at Mary Mattingly’s “Swale”, July 2016

I’ve long been interested in how artists use their work towards social justice and social change. “Artists are in a unique position to critique institutional power as they are both the victims of oppression… as well as its enablers” Ilana Novick recently wrote for Hyperallergic

In the wake of the 2016 US presidential election we’ve seen artists, curators, and art institutions respond to what is happening. MoMA, for example, in response to Trump’s Muslim Ban, replaced several works in its permanent collection galleries with works by artists from Muslim-majority nations, affected by the ban. Nasty Women Exhibition demonstrated solidarity among artists in support of women’s rights and access to reproductive healthcare. 

Recently, I met with someone who is “on the ground” working every day to support artists and collectives creating work that enacts social change. Joelle Te Paske is Programs and Communications Manager at A Blade of Grass, a NYC-based arts nonprofit dedicated to socially engaged art. I asked Joelle about using art as a tool for social change, artists’ role in local communities, and some of Joelle’s current favorite projects.

Continue reading

Category: Art/Music, Community, Culture | Tags: , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Synth Pop For The Subconscious From Williamsburg’s Lost Valley

Lost Valley's Nick Crane. Photo by Megan Penmann
Lost Valley’s Nick Crane. Photo by Megan Penmann

Lost Valley is named after a place in the mountains of Maine that Williamsburg musician Nick Crane used to go skiing as a kid; he liked the phrase’s sense of mystery and that it also conjures up a feeling of magic. And it just effortlessly sounds like a band name, the same way his first record effortlessly sounds like it goes deeper than a debut. Lost Valley’s self-titled 7-song EP is totally dreamy and mellow electro pop intertwined with sexy arrangements and a high production value. Behind the scenes it’s a one-man operation, with Nick having written and recorded everything solo—save for a friend who recorded a few live drum loops and another friend who mastered the record. But on stage, Lost Valley is a five-piece band made up of guitars, bass, percussion and vocals, with tight sonic choreography syncing up with projected visuals. The band has only performed live once so far, last month at Legion (790 Metropolitan Ave.), to a sold out crowd.

Continue reading

Category: Art/Music | Tags: , , , , | 0 Comments

This Weekend! Open Call For 48 Consecutive Hours of Art

permission slip - shim galleryThis weekend, local gallery concept/artist organization SHIM (289 Meserole St.) is hosting the second edition of Permission Slip, an experimental open call festival of live art performances, interactions, exhibitions, and collaborations.

Details via Facebook:

48 CONSECUTIVE HOURS // Friday Feb 24th @6pm – Sunday Feb 26th @6pm
@ SHIM | 289 Meserole Street

Curators Wilson Duggan and Jackie Cantwell will administer the gallery 24 hours per day, accepting proposals from the public to participate in the weekend’s schedule of activities.

TO PARTICIPATE: Simply fill out a permission slip (email [email protected]) with your proposal for an art performance, activity, micro-exhibition, etc, and bring it to the gallery on Friday evening (2/24) to receive our permission.
Your proposal can literally be anything within the limits of reason, legality, and the safety of the space and participants. Once granted permission, we will schedule a time for you on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday and provide you with whatever additional support we can to help you realize your project.

Category: Art/Music | Tags: , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Six Art Shows To Check Out This Weekend!

WAH Salon Show
Works from the WAH Salon Show

Williamsburg Art & Historical Center | 135 Broadway
18th Annual WAH Salon Show
This exhibit featuring dozens of artists is closing this weekend, so go check it out! The WAH Center offers an artist membership program called the “WAH Salon Art Club”. Every January, the members can participate in the Annual WAH Salon Show, which gives exposure to artists of a wide range and spectrum – from emerging, to mid-career, and established artists in all media. In concept, the Salon is all the colors of the artist’s palette.
Exhibit closing this weekend, gallery open Friday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

Greenpoint Gallery | 390 McGuinness Blvd.
“Salon De Eros”
This show proposes to be an “erotic showcase of love and its carnal delights, aiming to blush, excite and provoke viewers”, showing a range of local artists.
Opening event Friday, February 17th, 8pm-1am Continue reading

Category: Art/Music | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments