bridge

The Kosciuszko Bridge is Falling Down: Pieces Barged Out Today, And You Can Watch!

Photo via Newtown Creek Alliance Instagram

All day yesterday (Tuesday) the main span of the Kosciuszko Bridge was lowered onto barges on Newtown Creek. The bridge segments will be barged out of the Creek today, from 10am to 12pm. The pieces will be taken to a recycling facility in New Jersey. The Newtown Creek Alliance has a handy timeline of the bridge’s demolition, and future plans for a park on the Queens side of the new bridge.

Below, the NCA has put together a map of the best viewpoints for today’s barging, which include the very end of Greenpoint Avenue, the Newtown Creek Nature Walk, under the Pulaski Bridge, and the end of Manhattan Avenue. If you’re one of the lucky seafaring few in a boat, there will be security zones in place during lowering and barging; boaters are required to stay a minimum 500 feet away from the working barges.

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Slashing In McGolrick, L-Pocalypse & Paulie Gee’s Server Injured — The Hook-Up 5/26

Franklin St & Greenpoint Ave. Photo: Megan Penmann
Franklin St & Greenpoint Ave sunset. Photo: Megan Penmann

According to police, a man was slashed and robbed in McGolrick Park Saturday night around 9:30pm. He had seen someone in a group of people drop a pack of cigarettes and went to return them—only to get his head smashed on a metal bar, slashed on his cheek with a knife and robbed of his iPhone, $250 in cash and a bracelet.

A Paulie Gee’s server was seriously injured after a cyclist struck her on the corner of Manhattan and India. Without insurance, she’s now facing $10k in medical bills and $25k of  bills and lost wages combined while she recovers. You can donate to her crowdfunding campaign to help her recover physically and financially. Continue reading

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Behold, The Brand Spankin’ New Kosciuszko Bridge!

The new Kosciuszko Bridge finally opened yesterday to much fanfare (and of course, some traffic). If you’re passing by at night, or on a rooftop, you’ll be able to catch the rad light show, which was funded with the $500 million that the MTA chipped in for bridge overhauls. According to CBS New York, “The first of two new spans opened to drivers Thursday. It will carry traffic in both directions while the second span is built. The first span will be converted to five lanes of Queens-bound traffic when the second span containing four lanes opens in 2020 for Brooklyn-bound traffic. The bridge will also feature a 20-foot-wide path for cyclists and pedestrians.”

The old sections of the bridge will be imploded this summer, and there’s currently a petition to have a live orchestra play the 1812 Overture as the bridge literally bites the dust. More than 14,000 people have RSVP’d to the bridge blow-up on Facebook, with another 56,000 people “interested” in the event. And PS—if you’re wondering how to pronounce Kosciuszko, here’s a video primer with a little history mixed in.

Yesterday, photographer Nick McManus was able to ride over the bridge before it opened to traffic and captured some cool instant photos. See more after the jump.

The new Kosciuszko Bridge. photo by Nick McManus
The new Kosciuszko Bridge. photo by Nick McManus

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How Greenpoint Helped Build The Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is a majestic span with its elegant gothic towers and roadway suspended above the East River. Today we take it for granted, but at the time it was built it was called “the eighth wonder of the world.” However, the bridge never would have been built without major contributions from a Greenpoint shipyard and an engineer from Kent Street.

The first step in building the towers for the mighty bridge was designing caissons, or huge metal boxes, that were to be sunk to the riverbed so that diggers could dig down and find bedrock to plant the towers on. John Roebling, the chief architect for the bridge, designed these massive caissons in 1868 and gave the demanding contract to assemble them to a shipbuilding firm located at the foot of Milton Street: Webb and Bell. Continue reading

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