hurricane sandy

L Train Non-Shutdown Starts 4/26

 

We are just a week away from the Cuomo non-shutdown of the L train, as the unreviewed Canarsie Tunnel repair plan officially starts April 26 to fix the damage incurred during Hurricane Sandy, with expected completion in the summer of 2020.

Starting Friday (4/26), commuters between Brooklyn and Manhattan can expect L service to slow to 20-minute increments beginning at 8 p.m. through 5 a.m. on weeknights; more details on the non-shutdown from the MTA:

Weekdays 5 AM to 10 PM Regular L service, reducing at 8 PM
Weeknights 10 PM to 1:30 AM Reduced L service
Weeknights 1:30 AM to 5 AM Regular L service (every 20 minutes)
Weekends 6 AM to 1:30 AM Reduced L service
Weekend nights 1:30 AM to 6 AM Regular L service (every 20 minutes)

With the revised approach, L customers will have normal service during the highest ridership times.

Weeknights: 8 PM to 5 AM L trains run every 20 minutes between Brooklyn and Manhattan and every 10 minutes within Brooklyn. Service will ramp down starting at 8 PM to make room for work trains. Overnight, between 1:30 AM and 5 AM, the service runs at its normal frequency, with L trains running every 20 minutes.

Weekends: 8 PM Friday until 5 AM Monday, L trains run 20 minutes between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and every 10 minutes within Brooklyn. Overnight, between 1:30 AM and 5 AM, service runs at its normal frequency, with L trains running every 20 minutes.

L trains will run every 10 minutes within Brooklyn thanks to extra “overlay” trains between Lorimer St and Canarsie-Rockaway Pkwy. We’ll be running these trains during the busiest times L service is impacted by tunnel work (10 PM- 1:30 AM weeknights and 6 AM to 1:30 AM weekends). Service on the L will be reduced nights and weekends. We’ll be enhancing M, G, 7, and bus service to provide alternatives.

The new alternative service map (via MTA)

To compensate for reduced L train service, The MTA says it plans to increase the frequency of G, M and 7 trains:

M service

Weeknights, we’ll extend the hours of normal weekday service into Manhattan, between 10PM and 1:30 AM. After 10 PM on weeknights, we’ll extend M service up to 96 St-2 Av on the Q , instead of to Queens Blvd.

Weekends, we’ll extend service from Essex St to 96 St-2 Av. M trains will run every 8 minutes instead of every 10 minutes during the day.

G service

Weeknights we’ll be running 5 additional G trips between 8:30 PM and 1:30 AM. On weekends, trains will run every 8 minutes instead of every 10 minutes during the day.

7 service

Weeknights, we’ll run 5 additional trips from 8:30 PM to midnight. On weekends, 7 trains will continue to run every 4 to 7 ½ minutes.

New free transfers

  • Between Livonia St on the L and Junius St on the 3

  • Between Hewes St/Lorimer St on the J and M and Broadway on the G

A new “Williamsburg Link” bus will run between the Bedford L station and the Hewes Street J/M station stopping at the Metropolitan Avenue G/L station and Marcy Avenue J/M station en route.

We are introducing a new bus, the Williamsburg Link. It will operate on two routes, one clockwise (B92) and one counterclockwise (B91). This bus will provide double the bus service we normally do when there is no L service during weekend and weeknight construction work.

These buses provide connection between:

  • the Bedford Av L,
  • Metropolitan Av- Lorimer St G / L,
  • Marcy Av J / M, and
  • Hewes St J /M (B92 only).

Weekday nights

B91 B92
8 PM-9 PM Every 9 minutes Every 9 minutes
9 PM-12 AM Every 5 minutes Every 5 minutes
12 AM-5 AM Every 10 minutes Every 10 minutes

Weekends

B91 B92
5 AM-8 AM Every 10 minutes Every 10 minutes
8 AM-10 PM Every 3 minutes Every 3 minutes
10 PM-12 AM Every 5 minutes Every 5 minutes
12 AM-1:30 AM Every 10 minutes Every 10 minutes

The M14A regular bus service in Manhattan will run every four to five minutes across 14th Street from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. and to the Delancey-Essex J/M station every seven to ten minutes.

Category: News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Essay: Gee vs. Elle, A Tale of Two Subways

Gee’s been in her older sister’s shadow for a while. Like, since 1933. She heard legend of Elle’s flapper-filled carts and smooth shuttling of partiers from soirée to soirée, borough to borough, without ever so much as rattling their champagne, which they could drink whilst riding cause Elle was a “cool train.”

Continue reading

Category: Community | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

MTA Introduces Two Major Plans for L Train Renovation

On Thursday, May 5, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) held its first community meeting to discuss two proposed plans for the Canarsie Tunnel renovation, the final step in the MTA’s Sandy Recovery Work plan and a major concern for Brooklyn residents who use the L train daily.

The first plan, which all officials seemed to favor (emphasized by the noticeably longer “pro” list in the presentation), proposes an 18-month turnaround, with work beginning in January 2019 and ending in July 2020, and requires a complete shutdown of the L train from 8th Ave to Bedford Ave. The train would run as normal from Bedford Ave to Rockaway Parkway. This plan would give the agency more flexibility with contractors and would get the work done as quickly and efficiently as possible.

IMG_3030 IMG_3029

The second plan, which would take three years, would leave one tunnel open, allowing the train to run at 12-to-15 minute intervals from 8th Ave to Bedford Ave: only 20% of the current level of service the L train provides. There would be no train service at all between Bedford and Lorimer, with a shuttle bus as an alternative. Service would run as normal between Lorimer and Rockaway Parkway. Continue reading

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

You’ve Heard About the L-Pocalypse. What About the G-Pocalypse?

greenpointg16
Photo: Jeremiah Cox

The L Train is facing an imminent, extensive shutdown in the wake of lingering Hurricane Sandy damage, and North Brooklyn hasn’t taken the news very well.

And why would it, given the amount of daily riders who travel through the Canarsie Tube every day — around 350,000 — not to mention the huge impact ridership has on local businesses?

Currently, the MTA is considering two options to implement as early as 2017: to close the entire tunnel nonstop for one year, or to leave one side open and reduce traffic to half-volume, which would take anywhere from three to four years.

Not ones to bide their time quietly, a number of local residents and business owners have already formed The L Train Coalition to demand a better solution from the MTA, though many know full well that the answer will definitely be “pain.”

Pain, of course, can be abstract or painted in sharp relief. And while a fair amount of ink has been spilled over the implications for L Train commuters, there are fewer educated guesses regarding the fate of surrounding areas like Greenpoint, which will absorb a great deal of shock from the closure as riders scramble to find alternative routes. Continue reading

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Weekend Music Picks: June 26 – 28

Butler Bernstein & The Hot 9

I am heading out to Reno tomorrow, where I promise not to shoot a man just to watch him die. But with travelling on my mind, this week I have you biking to Bushwick for a couple of shows, and on the G train Saturday heading to some modern stride jazz piano at an outdoor dance party in Prospect Park.

Thanks to Sonya P. who wrote up some of her own recommendations for part of this post.

Here are our weekend picks. Continue reading

Category: Art/Music, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

G Train is back on track.

Photo credit Kim M

Five weeks ago, we all bemoaned the G Train closure and the anxious questions that came along with it: How are we going to get around? Will that damn Ferry be up and running? Where the hell did I put the air pump for my bike tires? After an August of shuttle buses, long lines, and traffic, all the bitching has come to an end. The G train is finally restored.

When Sandy hit we all knew it was going to be bad for our subway tunnels. Millions of salt water and copper wires made fore a corrosive mess; our G line was one of the hardest hit tunnels in the system. So while we were being shepherded over the Pulsaki Bridge and down Manhattan Ave in air-conditioned shuttle buses, which some seemed to prefer,  crews of MTA workers repaired tracks and switches. The whopping total for fast track repairs in a post-Sandy NYC came out $80 million dollars.
Continue reading

Category: Community, News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | 0 Comments

No G Train Service This Weekend (from Greenpoint Ave to Ct. Square)

From MTA Weekender:

Reminder: due to Sandy Recovery work there are no trains between Nassau Av and Court Sq. Free shuttle buses provide alternate service.

Manhattan Ave shuttle buses run between Nassau Av and Court Sq, stopping at Greenpoint Av and 21 St.

McGuinness Blvd shuttle buses run between Lorimer St and Court Sq,
stopping at Nassau Av, Greenpoint Av and 21 St.

Weekends, 11:45 PM Fri to 5 AM Mon, Jul 5 – 8 • Jul 12 – 15 • Jul 19 – 22

I know this totally blows, but this giff makes up for it just a little wee bit.

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency: Post Sandy Workshop Tomorrow (3/14)

© Newtown Creek Alliance

“…the single most important piece of unfinished business that lies ahead of us in 2013: rebuilding the communities hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy – and creating a more resilient and sustainable city.” – Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s State of the City Address, February 14, 2013

Via Newtown Creek Alliance:

The Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) addresses how we rebuild New York City to be more resilient in the wake of Hurricane Sandy but with a long-term focus.

We invite you to join us for a facilitated conversation about how to rebuild Williamsburg, Greenpoint, DUMBO, Long Island City and surrounding communities. We are looking for participants who are invested in this neighborhood now and for the next generation.

SIRR Williamsburg/Greenpoint/DUMBO/LIC Public Workshop
March 14, 2013
7:00 pm
P.S. 132 (320 Manhattan Ave)

We begin with a brief introduction of SIRR and will have break-out sessions to discuss priorities for rebuilding Northern Brooklyn and Long Island City to be more resilient in the face of future storms and long-term climate change.

RSVP by email: RSVPWaterFrontMarch14 (at) nycsirr.org.
Include the full name and email (if available) of each guest.

RSVP by phone: (212) 618-5745 – Leave the name of each guest and say “for March 14 Waterfront”.

 

Category: Events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Church of the Ascension Occupied for Sandy

Church of the Ascension on Java Street has been Occupied. The church, which began helping coordinate relief efforts (with Councilmember Steve Levin) for Hurricane Sandy survivors immediately after the storm, has just been more formally Occupied by Occupy Sandy, an off-shoot of Occupy Wall Street. The Greenpoint site is largely replacing the 520 Clinton Street location at the Church of St Luke and St Matthew in Clinton Hill, after a December 23rd two-alarm fire at that location which fire officials have called “suspicious” and  Church Father Chris Ballard called “arson.”

The church, Occupy Sandy’s first Greenpoint location, will serve as an office hub for the various Occupy Sandy locales in the city and as a headquarters for “volunteer dispatch operations” to the Rockaways, Gerritsen Beach, Red Hook, Coney Island, Staten Island, and Sheepshead Bay, where survivors continue to struggle with little help aside from volunteers like Occupy Sandy and others.

Occupy Sandy will also use the locale to offer a regularly scheduled orientation for new volunteers interested in helping in the ongoing long-term relief effort. More information is available on the Occupy Sandy website.

Greenpoint’s response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath began immediately after the storm through City Councilmember Steve Levin, and both Church of the Ascension and Greenpoint Reformed Church.

As reported in the Greenpoint Star and DNAinfo, there are Greenpoint residents still suffering the affects the storm including moldy basements and problems getting insurance or government to help with necessary cleanup funds.

Category: Community, News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | 0 Comments

#Sandy Relief Tee: Rebuild NY… In Style

Show your support for Sandy Relief Efforts with this styling Tee-shirt.

About the design: The heart in the hurricane logo was one inspired by all of the love and support people were sharing, amidst the devastation that existed.

A group of New Yorkers volunteering in the Rockaways and Staten Island decided that they needed to create a platform to raise money for continuing Sandy relief efforts. The result of their dedication and inspiration is Let’s Rebuild NY.

By purchasing a Tee-shirt from www.letsrebuildny.com, you’ll not only be supporting New Yorkers effected by Hurricane Sandy, but looking dapper doing it. I can’t wait to rock mine with my favorite pair of Zubaz pants.

All Let’s Rebuild NY Tee-shirts are produced in NY, and every penny of the net proceeds is going towards supporting those suffering from the impact of Sandy through a partnership with the Red Cross.

Category: Style/Shopping | Tags: , , , , , , | 0 Comments