Domino Sugar refinery

New Renderings of Domino Sugar Redevelopment Show Glass-Domed Design

(Courtesy of PAU Architects/World Architecture)

New renderings of the Domino Sugar Refinery redevelopment have been released by PAU architects. The developer, Two Trees Management has proposed an 11-foot height increase to the original design of 292-314 Kent Avenue, historically known as the Havemeyer & Elder Filter, Pan & Finishing House.

(Courtesy of PAU Architects/World Architecture)

In 2017, the Landmarks Preservation Commission initially approved the plan to add a glass-domed building with a barrel-vaulted ceiling inside the brick facade of the centerpiece of the redevelopment.

(Courtesy of PAU Architects/YIMBY)

According to YIMBY:

The PAU design team has proposed a height increase of the building’s domed glass roof from 224 feet to 235 feet. New elevation diagrams also appear to eliminate the building’s 16th floor. Instead, levels one through four, 14, and 15 include increased ceiling spans of varying heights.

Updated proposals also include a newly designed stair system positioned between the two volumes of the domed expansion. Previous iterations of the stair system existed fully within the glass structure.

Pending approvals, the building will include ground-floor retail, 12 levels of office space, and a 14th-floor event space with double-height ceilings, a catering kitchen, and back-of-house areas. According to Two Trees, the developers of the property, completion is anticipated in the early 2020s.

(Courtesy of PAU Architects/World Architecture)

Over 2,000 apartments are planned at the Domino development, including more than 700 affordable apartments.

(Courtesy of PAU Architects/World Architecture)
(Courtesy of PAU Architects/World Architecture)
(Courtesy of PAU Architects/World Architecture)
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Domino Sugar’s Enduring Lesson of Local History

The Domino refinery in 2008 (courtesy of Doug Letterman/Flickr)

The philosopher George Santayana once famously said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” I do not know if Santayana ever visited our area, but Santayana’s words relate to North Brooklyn’s struggle to recall its unique history and preserve the landmarks that help us remember our area’s fascinating past.


Last Saturday, I led about 75 hard souls who braved the rain on a walking tour of the Domino Refinery, which was once the largest sugar refinery in the world, processing at its height one-eighth of all the sugar refined on the planet! Today, the great refinery is being transformed into a mixed-use development.

Although the façade of the Domino building is landmarked and must be preserved, the building’s interior is being removed and it will become luxury condominiums and offices. Already huge metal stanchions have been attached to the exterior wall to facilitate gutting the historic refinery. Our history is being destroyed before our very eyes. Continue reading

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