Community

Coat of Arms Closing, and More Changes Around Manhattan Ave

Coat of Arms (654 Manhattan Ave.)

The changes on and around Manhattan Avenue for shopping and dining continue with recent openings and closings.

As announced on their Instagram, streetwear outlet and skateshop Coat of Arms (674 Manhattan Avenue) is closing after this Sunday, Jan. 20. The business originally opened in the Lower East Side in 2006 and relocated to its current Greenpoint location in 2014.

COA owner Aaron Hansen is preparing to move out west to sunny California and the lease is up at the Manhattan Avenue building, he’s also getting married in the spring and is ready for the next chapter. “Right now there is no plan to open a new location in CA but never say never,” Hansen said. He was also planning on keeping COA open through Sunday with the ongoing clearance sale, but the store’s stock is nearly sold out and the winter weather might impact foot traffic this weekend. “We’re almost sold out of everything, it’s looking pretty lonely in here now. Depending on today’s foot traffic and looking at the weather I think we may close Saturday night since Sunday looks pretty nasty,” Hansen said. Stop in on Saturday and wish him farewell.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

It’s been a great ride but our lease is over and I’m getting married & moving to California. We will be closing #coatofarmsbrooklyn for good on Sunday Jan. 20th 2019 . Thank you to all our brands, loyal customers and supporters all over the world. Special shout to everyone in #Greenpoint for 5 amazing years in the best neighborhood in New York . We don’t have much inventory left but our last deal is basically legalized stealing. We’ve marked everything down to at least 50% off!! . Plus from now until Sunday at 6pm at #674manhattanave take an additional 50% OFF the marked sale prices by mentioning BOSCO at checkout . THAT’S 75% OFF EVERYTHING!!! Plus a $5 @stancesocks socks bin, $10 snapbacks & beanies bin and free @thrashermag & @sneezemag’s till we run out. ALL SALES ARE FINAL! Roll thru. Going to miss you guys . – @aaron_hansen

A post shared by COA Brooklyn (@coatofarms) on

Just a few steps off of Manhattan Avenue, Norman Cafe (93 Norman Ave.) opened three weeks ago serving breakfast, lunch and dinner with a 100 percent vegetarian menu and many vegan and gluten-free options. The owner Jamal, who has lived in Greenpoint for 22 years, opened Greenburg Deli (236 N. 12th St.) near Mccarren Park (at Urban Rustics’ former space) in 2018, but decided to relocate to Norman Ave. by the G train after seeing slower than expected foot traffic in the winter.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

can’t wait to meet you all !!

A post shared by norman cafe (@normancafe) on

With the location change, Jamal saw an opportunity to serve the neighborhood’s growing veggie food scene: “Most of our sales were vegetarian options at Greenburg,” Jamal said, adding that the vegan burrito with scrambled turmeric tofu, brown rice, black beans, and pico de gallo is one of the most popular menu items so far.

Norman Cafe is open Mon. – Fri. from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., and weekends from 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Continuing the plant-based trend in Greenpoint, the wonderful Polish women of Happy Zoe Vegan Bakery (102 Nassau Ave.) also relocated from their original Williamsburg location, in part due to the anticipation of the former l train shutdown, and are serving freshly baked vegan and gluten-free sweets. The cafe is run by a team of sisters and their mother who in addition to the baked goods also make delicious crepes for breakfast and sandwiches for lunch. Happy Zoe Bakery is open Tues. – Thur. 10 a.m. – 7:30 p.m., and Sundays 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Vegan Gluten Free Crepe!! We serve them all day long #incredible #vegan #glutenfree #nyc #greenpoint

A post shared by Happy Zoe Vegan Bakery (@happyzoeveganbakery) on

Category: Community, Eat & Drink, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

North Brooklyn Is Home to One of America’s Oldest Mosques

Powers Street Mosque (via Google Maps)

I had often walked by the inconspicuous former church at 104 Powers St. near the border of Greenpoint and Williamsburg, yet I never noticed the sole sign that this was a Muslim house of worship. Then last week, I suddenly noticed the crescent moon protruding above the roof and I realized that the building was a mosque, hiding in plain sight. Growing curious, I did some digging and discovered that the building was not only a mosque, but also the first mosque founded in the United States. The Mosque’s faithful, though, are so unobtrusive and the services so infrequent that even longtime local residents are shocked to learn that 104 Powers St. has been a local Muslim house of worship for four generations.

The structure at 104 Powers St. shows that it was once a church. In the 188os Methodists built a house of worship, but like many Christian denominations, the congregation dwindled and the Methodists were forced to merge congregations, abandoning the Powers Street building. The building served as a Democratic Party clubhouse for a few years, but in 1931, the American Mohammedan Society, Inc., a group of Tatar immigrants from Lithuania, Poland and Belarus— bought the property from the 13th Assembly District Realty Company, for the purposes of converting the property into a mosque.

A picture of the Tatar immigrants who founded the Mosque ( courtesy of Bedford and Bowery)

Continue reading

Category: (Not)Forgotten Greenpoint, Community, Culture | Tags: , , , , , | 0 Comments

Visioning Meeting for Bushwick Inlet Parks’ Motiva Site 1/24

 

Here’s your chance to have some input on the future of the Motiva site at Bushwick Inlet Park at the waterfront border of Williamsburg and Greenpoint. The meeting will take place at the Bushwick Inlet Park Building at  86 Kent Ave. (building at Kent Avenue/N. 9th Street) on Thursday, Jan. 24, at  6 p.m., more details here.

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Public Visioning Meeting for The Motiva Site at BIP Design The Next Phase of Your Park! Another section of Bushwick Inlet Park is moving forward with development into usable park space! Have your say in its use and design at the Public Visioning Session being held by NYC Parks & Recreation. Come share your ideas! We have waited so long. Thursday January 24th, 2019 – 6pm Bushwick Inlet Park Building 86 Kent Ave @ N 9th Street Brooklyn, NY 11249 Want to learn more? Can’t make the meeting? Contact and send suggestions to [email protected] or call 718-965-6991. This your opportunity to imagine & voice what this next important phase of Bushwick Inlet Park will be. Knock yourself out with creative, unique park design ideas. The development of the Motiva site, which encompasses the inlet itself, is another step towards creating magnificent passive green space at Bushwick Inlet.

A post shared by Bushwick Inlet Park (@bushwickinletpark) on

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , , | 0 Comments

The Brooklyn Kitchen to Host Closing Party for Frost Street Location

After an eventful 10-year-run at 100 Frost St., the good folks at the Brooklyn Kitchen are closing their Williamsburg location (don’t worry classes are still available at Industry City), but not before throwing a big party.

After 10 never boring years at the big old leaky warehouse under the BQE, Harry and Taylor are clearing their cabinets of curiosities and inviting their friends over to eat, drink, and imagine merriment in the face of society’s inevitable collapse. Expect steampunk maximalism, a fair amount of rust, out of print cookbooks, Gourmet magazines from your birth year. Records stored in unarchival conditions. Relics and mementos.

Art, music, food, drink. An epic loft sale / rent party the likes of which 11211 hasn’t seen since 11249.

 

 

Category: Community, Culture, News | Tags: , , , , , | 0 Comments

1940s Greenpoint: Franklin Street

A few months ago the city released its 1940s tax photo archive of over 700,000 black and white pictures and it’s a wonderful way for history nerds to waste hours dreaming of the Greenpoint days of yore. As part of the New Deal, the Works Progress Administration employed millions of Americans on public projects, and the NYC Dept. of Taxation hired a team of photographers under the program in 1939 – 1940 to snap pictures of every building in the city for property tax assessment. Greenpointers will be posting side-by-side photos to observe changes in the neighborhood; please note that the addresses are approximate and refer to the listings from the city’s tax archive. First up, Franklin Street:

Dupont and Franklin streets in 1940 (NYC tax archive)
Dupont and Franklin streets in 2018 Google Maps)
233 Franklin St. in 1940 (NYC tax archive)
233 Franklin St. in 2018 (Google Maps)
129 Franklin St. in 1940 (NYC tax archive)
129 Franklin St. in 2018 (Google Maps)
214-218 Franklin St 1940 (NYC tax archive)
214-218 Franklin St 2018 (Google Maps)

Continue reading

Category: (Not)Forgotten Greenpoint, Community, Culture | Tags: , , , , | 0 Comments

Behold the Yacht-Friendly Future of Greenpoint at 53 Huron Street

(Atlantis Arts Studio)

Quadrum Global filed plans this week with the Dept. of Buildings for a 14-story, 150-foot tall residential building at 53 Huron St. (also known as 161 West St.) with 173 units spanning 178,000 square feet.

The development includes 86 enclosed parking spaces and would span 278,000 square feet at West Street between Huron and Green streets. The rendering envisions a yacht-friendly future for the building on the Greenpoint waterfront, which would neighbor the 40-story tower ‘The Greenpoint.”

(Atlantis Arts Studio)

Continue reading

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

Polish Kotwica Symbol Sparks Debate on Usage

Kotwica flag flies high in Greenpoint (via Polish and Slavic Federal Credit Union)

When Greenpointers received a tip last week that someone was allegedly passing out flyers identifying hate symbols following the discovery of hate stickers on McGuiness Blvd, we posted an image of the flyer to Instagram and began to receive many messages from local Polish residents that the Kotwica symbol should not be placed in the same category as the Swastika and other hate symbols. We also received messages insisting that the far right in Poland has recently used patriotic symbology during rallies, including the Kotwica. The local debate even received the attention of staff at the Polish Consulate in New York and the Greenpoint-based Polish and English radio station and news site, Radio Rampa, posted on the matter.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

With the rise in hate crimes in NYC in 2018, along with the spread of hate symbol graffiti in Brooklyn, someone is passing out flyers in Greenpoint to educate on how to identify hate symbols. We reported on an incident from last Sunday in which a Greenpointer discovered a series of hate graffiti stickers along Mcguinness Blvd. Read more at greenpointers.com ——————————— Many Polish businesses display the Kotwika symbol. It was the symbol of resistance to the fascist forces attacking Poland, then became the symbol of independence against the Soviets. It’s a symbol of great pride amongst the Polish culture that has been co-opted by a small number of fascists today.

A post shared by greenpointers (@greenpointers) on

It’s a fact that the Kotwica is a symbol of the underground Polish resistance fighters who fought against Nazi occupation in the 1940s. The symbol to commemorate the resistance fighters is also found in Greenpoint on a flag during summer months at the Polish and Slavic Federal Credit Union on McGuiness Boulevard and on a mural on Eckford Street around the corner from the Warsaw music venue.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

The Polish Kotwica symbol of the resistance against Nazi Germany and Russian Soviets has been misidentified as a hate symbol with the recent wave of hate crimes in Brooklyn. Earlier in the week we posted a picture of a flyer that someone was handing out in Greenpoint. The creator of the flyer placed the Kotwica symbol next to other well-known symbols of fascist groups, and we would like to clarify that the Kotwica is not a hate symbol. In fact, it can be found around Greenpoint in honor of the Polish resistance fighters who served. Every year it’s displayed on a flag at the Polish Slavic credit union on Mcguinnes Boulevard and is painted on a mural at Warsaw on Eckford Street. Scroll through and checkout the clip from @radiorampa, the Greenpoint-based Polish/English radio station.

A post shared by greenpointers (@greenpointers) on

Continue reading

Category: Community, Culture, News | Tags: , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

The Lasting Gifts to Greenpoint From the Man Cheated out of the U.S. Presidency

Samuel Tilden

Looking for a great local trivia question? Which two men associated with Greenpoint ran for president of the United States? The answer: Samuel Tilden who was cheated in the election of 1876 and Charles Evans Hughes, who lived on Milton Street, who lost in 1916.

If you are a Brooklynite you might have heard of Tilden High School, but few people know anything about this important figure in local and state history. Although he is a forgotten figure today, few men did more to help New York State. Tilden was first elected to the New York State Assembly in 1846, and few legislators in state history did more good. He used his position to expose corruption in state government, most notably through the impeachment of New York State Supreme Court Justices George G. Barnard, Albert Cardozo, and John H. McCunn.

His exposure of corruption within the U.S. Customs House was soon overshadowed by his most famous political achievement: the exposure and prosecution of the Tweed Ring, led by William M. “Boss” Tweed whose name lives down through the ages as a symbol of Tammany Hall Corruption. Tweed introduced a new city charter, which would further consolidate his corrupt hold on power, but Tilden, as chairman of the Democratic State Committee, denounced him and began a pitched battle to disable the Ring and end Tweed’s corrupt practices. Tilden’s successful prosecution of the Tweed Ring paved the way for his election as Governor in 1874. Two years later, Tilden became the Democratic nominee for president and probably won the election, but his own party sold him out in the corrupt bargain of 1876 that ended Reconstruction.

National Democratic chart in 1876 with candidates Samuel J. Tilden, and Thomas A. Hendricks (via PICRYL)

In the 1850s Tilden became one of the most successful corporate lawyers in America and a rich man. He also invested in Greenpoint real estate. The piece of land Tilden bought covered an area from Oak Street to Noble Street and ran from the river to Leonard Street. Tilden helped Greenpoint and increased the value of his real estate through his efforts in Albany supporting the bill allowing Neziah Bliss to open a ferry to Manhattan.
Tilden sold off his holdings piece by piece in the 1870s and he must have profited massively from these sales. He sold a piece at the top of Milton Street to Thomas Smith, the millionaire ceramicist whose home became the Greenpoint Reformed Church.

Union Baptist Church (via Google Maps)

However, today we remember Tilden more for his charity than for his wealth. He was one of the founders of the New York Public Library System, but his charity had many positive local effects too. He believed that Greenpoint should have churches. He gave a cut-rate price to the congregation of the Noble Street Baptist Church (known as Union Baptist Church), allowing them in 1860 to build their landmarked red brick home. He also owned the land on which St. Anthony of Padua sits. Although not a Catholic himself, he gave Bishop Loughlin a sweetheart deal, charging the church for only one of five lots they purchased on Manhattan Avenue and Leonard Street. The stately church was built in 1874.

Continue reading

Category: (Not)Forgotten Greenpoint, Community, Culture | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 0 Comments

Community Outrage After Hate Speech Graffiti Discovered

The spread of hate speech graffiti targeting the black, Jewish, and LGBT communities in Brooklyn has caused a lot of concern locally, and questions were raised as to how to best report it after a series of U.S. postal stickers with hate speech was discovered last week along McGuinness Boulevard in Greenpoint.

North Brooklyn Democratic District Leader Nick Rizzo condemned the hate speech and in a statement pointed out the connection between Nazism and White Nationalism.

This incident shows the connection between Nazism, which we all know is un-American, and White Nationalism, which a bunch of American politicians openly support. Please be alert to rising Far Right incitements: We cannot allow hate to gain strength in Brooklyn. Know that ’14 words’ and 88 (code for ‘Heil Hitler’) are both White Nationalist symbols.

Brooklyn resident Mallory Seegal, who discovered the stickers on Sunday, adds that she was ‘disgusted’ by the language.

When I found these stickers on Sunday, I was disgusted but by no means surprised. This is just one example, out of many, of how white supremacy manifests. The complex and ongoing system of white supremacy is the disease, and the individual actions of white nationalists and white supremacists are a symptom. We are looking at two sides of the same coin.

While Greenpointers intended to help bring attention to the incident, the NYPD says that posting on social media first hinders investigations into these crimes.

Officer Rivera of the NYPD’s 94th Precinct Community Affairs informed Greenpointers that the most effective way to report hate graffiti is to leave the graffiti untouched and call 911 immediately, as 911 operators will be able to determine if it’s a situation that can be referred to 311. Not contacting the authorities first and posting on social media impedes the timing of the investigation. A proper investigation is paramount and can lead to an arrest, he said.

A joint statement from Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams, Council Member Stephen Levin, Assembly Member Joseph Lentol, State Senator Julia Salazar, and Representative Carolyn Maloney says they are committed to bringing the community together to combat the issue.

We strongly condemn the virulently anti-Semitic, homophobic, and racist language that was inscribed on United States Postal Service stamps at lampposts and public spaces in multiple locations across north Greenpoint, including McGuiness Boulevard, Dupont Street, Eagle Street, and Freeman Street. Most disturbingly, the materials contained Nazi swastikas and the numbers 14 and 88, which refer to the fourteen-word slogan ‘we must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children,’ and the Heil Hitler salute respectively.

Unfortunately, these stickers are part of a wider pattern of neo-Nazi activity in the area around Greenpoint and Williamsburg, including swastikas that were spray-painted and etched on Manhattan Avenue and McGolrick Park in the past two years.

In response to this pattern of hate, we will be collaborating with a diverse range of community stakeholders across community-based organizations, houses of worship, and local businesses to bring residents of Greenpoint closer together. We cannot let this despicable act go unanswered, particularly as it is meant to intimidate members of our One Brooklyn family in a community that is made up of a diverse range of backgrounds from all walks of life.

We urge anyone with any information on who may be responsible for this reprehensible act to contact the NYPD by calling 800-577-TIPS.

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Legendary Founder of Williamsburg’s El Puente Luis Garden Acosta Passes Away

Luis Garden Acosta (courtesy of El Puente)

North Brooklyn’s Hispanic community is mourning one of its most beloved members, Luis Garden Acosta, who passed away yesterday. A towering community leader with a deep concern for social justice, Acosta was the founder and president of El Puente, a nationally celebrated, Brooklyn based, community/youth development organization. A man of great passion, Acosta was so active in a variety of fields that he defied easy identification. The community organizer and advocate for the disadvantaged, was also an environmental leader, a housing activist, and an educator, but he was something even bigger than these various roles. Acosta embodied the fighting spirit of the Hispanic community in North Brooklyn and his death leaves a massive void.

Perhaps his greatest legacy is the founding of the community organization El Puente, which means ‘the bridge’ in Spanish. As the name implies, ‘bridges’ connect people to major initiatives in health, the environment, education, and the arts. One of Luis’ ideas, the “Green Light District”, a 10-year project that has taken El Puente’s message door to door, engaging, virtually, every family in transforming the Southside of Williamsburg, from a crime infested underserved community to America’s model neighborhood for community health and environmental wellness.

His biography is worthy of being made into a film. Born locally in 1945, Acosta grew up in a poor mixed Dominican-Puerto Rican family. Entering St. Mary’s Seminary in Pennsylvania at age 15, he earned a college degree before starting to prepare himself to serve as a Catholic priest. Acosta’s plans changed, however, when he heard Martin Luther King Jr. deliver a speech on social justice. Instead of becoming a priest, Acosta became a political activist. A pacifist, he left the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer without taking his final vows as a priest, becoming a Catholic antiwar organizer in Brooklyn.

Continue reading

Category: Community, News | Tags: , , , , | 0 Comments