NuHart Superfund Cleanup Plan on the Way

nuhartNow that the smoke has cleared from the attempted Halloween dance party incident at the NuHart Superfund site, we’re back to the perennial and even messier topic of the proposed cleanup plan.

The Nov. 2 meeting held in Greenpoint with Dr. Peter deFur, the community’s technical consultant, was an opportunity for local residents to ask questions about the toxic contamination in the soil and groundwater.

DeFur assured residents: “Your presence and your voice will make a difference…I have seen examples of where the community voice is an important determinate and changes the outcome.”

The moment of truth involved an array of toxins that have been detected at low levels at the NuHart test wells, including benzene, but deFur posited that they are not a major concern for most Greenpointers.

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How Did a Massive Halloween Rave Almost Go Down in One of Greenpoint’s Most Dangerous Buildings?

Roux answered for what seem to be the sins of multiple parties at Monday's NAG meeting.
Roux answered for what seem to be the sins of multiple parties at Monday’s NAG meeting.

By now, most of you are familiar with the story of the Cityfox rave that never was. To sum it up briefly, a club promoter sold thousands of tickets to an all-night Halloween fête in Greenpoint’s toxic NuHart Plastics building. Due to intervention from the Fire Department, the party never quite made it to witching hour, but many residents are super pissed that something like this almost went down at a state Superfund site — and across the street from a senior center, no less.

Beyond that, the details are somewhat difficult to follow, which makes it hard to know exactly where to point fingers, even if the impetus is hardly in short supply. Cityfox issued a public apology yesterday, and organizers at Monday night’s NAG meeting made a point to save any rave-related questions for last, but the Q&A session quickly became a sounding board for public outrage. As one resident summed it up, the whole thing was a “huge slap in the face” for a community that’s been impacted by the building’s toxic history and is now grudgingly attempting to trust developers who claim to have its best interests in mind.

Fielding many of these questions was geologist Michael Roux, the environmental consultant for Dupont Street Developers LLC, which bought the NuHart site in 2014. He was joined by Yi Han, a representative of the group. Together, their account was confusing and at times seemingly contradictory to some of the other things we now know about the incident (for instance, Han said the owners never signed a contract, but NAG has supplied copies of the signed party permit on its website. To be clear, the building is owned by multiple parties). Additionally, Roux said that he wouldn’t be “totally forthcoming with everything [he knows],” as he’s been put on notice of potential legal action by the state.

In order to help make heads of tails, here’s a rough chronological timeline presented from multiple perspectives. Continue reading

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More Toxic Secrets In This Rare 1980s ‘Hazardous Neighbors’ Brooklyn Study


It’s been a busy couple of weeks in the world of toxic chemicals, specifically as they pertain to Greenpoint. First, Neighbors Allied For Good Growth (NAG) released the ToxiCity Map to bring confusing, widely scattered publicly available data together into one cohesive document. Now, we’re bringing you the long-lost 1980s factory-to-factory survey of Greenpoint and Williamsburg by Hunter College, a study that many lifetime Greenpoint residents say they couldn’t find or easily access until now.

It reveals the former locations and quantities of reactive chemicals — the kind that explode when they make contact with water, such as cyanide. In many cases, they’re shockingly close to residential buildings in Brooklyn’s priciest real estate drag. From speaking with a NAG member at the map release event, I also found that the “Hazardous Neighbors” study contains information that’s not available in the ToxiCity Map. Continue reading

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Tomorrow (10/20), ToxiCity Map Reveals Greenpoint & Williamsburg’s Contamination Trail

Did you know that North Brooklyn’s industrial legacy left behind an alphabet soup of toxins - TCEPCBs, phthalates, benzene, and many other chemicals – that’s lingering beneath the surface in many sections of our hood?

On October 20, a beta release of the ToxiCity Map will be hosted at Sunview Luncheonette, located at 221 Nassau Ave., starting at 7 p.m.

Source: Neighbors Allied For Good Growth
Source: Neighbors Allied For Good Growth

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Important Meeting on Superfund Nuhart Plastics this Monday!


nuhartTime to talk about our favorite superfund Nuhart Plastics again.

Recent developments are underway to turn the festering superfund site into affordable luxury apartments. Disturbed at that thought? Chew on this: Beneath Nuhart’s property there is a 40,000 to 60,000 gallon pool of thick plastic phlalates deep enough to swim in and two large plumes of TCE (a volatile organic compound) SPREADING to nearby streets. All of these chemicals are considered hazardous to human health.

In the very near future these toxins will be unearthed and removed, and yes, we neighbors need to know how we will be affected. Come meet our new community advisor, and superfund guru, Dr.Peter deFur, this Monday night and find out what Nuhart’s clean-up means for residents in the upcoming months.


Nuhart Superfund Clean-up Community Meeting

Monday, July 27th

6:30 pm

Senior Center 80 Dupont St (entrance on Eagle St)

hosted by NAG & Councilman Levin’s Office

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UPDATE: Superfund Nuhart Plastics. Seriously, you REALLY need to read this!


Since last Thursday’s meeting, many of you have written me personally expressing concerns about Nuhart’s status and what it means for the hood when a Superfund cleans up its act and turns into an “affordable luxury condo building”.  Sadly, what is happening at Nuhart is not an April Fool’s joke.

Well, I have good and bad news to report about our darling little Superfund.  I suggest we bust out our hazmat suits and get suited up. I’m going to take us into the trenches and talk about toxic plumes.

Yes, you read that correctly. There are TWO plumes at Nuhart, not one.

Got your suit zipped and your mask on tight? Alright Greenpointers, let’s get dirty and talk toxins. Continue reading

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Getty To Pay $16 Million Towards Clean Up Of Toxic Newtown Creek

In 1978 a US Coast Guard helicopter on a routine check spotted oil spilling into Newtown Creek. An estimated 30 million gallons leaked into the soil and water, causing health and environmental problems to the residents of Greenpoint – human and otherwise – ever since.

Look how pretty that toxic site is though!

This week, 36 years after the spill was first noticed, the government will receive more money to clean up the site from the people responsible for turning the creek into a polluted waterway. On Tuesday, the US government reached a settlement with Getty Petroleum which will pump an additional $16 million into the clean up of the designated Superfund site. As reported in the New York Post, Getty filed for bankruptcy back in 2011 and the federal government will receive the $16 million as part of that process.

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Newtown Creek Armada, Coastal Clean-up, Capital to Capital Canoe Expedition: What’s New at Newtown Creek?

There’s a whole sludge of events at Greenpoint’s very own Superfund site, Newtown Creek.

State of the Planet, a blog from the Earth Institute at Columbia University, is reporting that the city effort to clean up the polluted waterway is having an unintended effect.

According to a new study the clean up process is releasing sewage bacteria and other particles into the air above the site. The study is one of the first to establish a link between water pollution and air-quality, raising new questions about the health risks posed by dirty water.

Newtown Creek is already a source of combined sewage run-off, and could become even worse due to rising sea levels due from climate change. The New York Times ran an article highlighting the seriousness of the issue this Monday.

Don’t jump off the Pulaski Bridge just yet, Greenpointers. The news at Newtown Creek is not all bad. Here are just a few of the many upcoming community events looking to make the most of revitalizing our waterfront. Continue reading

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Is Greenpoint Safe? 10 Things To Do

Do you find it ironic that Greenpoint features the environmentally friendly Rooftop Farms, the new McGolrick Park Farmers Market, a Clean Green Dry Cleaners on Nassau Ave, among many other “green” initiatives? Are you confused that the Earth Day Celebration in McCarren Park is sponsored by Exxon Mobil?

We live on top of an oil spill nearly as big as the Exxon Valdez spill, cause by Exxon Mobil that has rendered the Newtown Creek and the soil underneath our homes extremely toxic. Almost half of the city’s trash is stored and processed in North Brooklyn. Part of Greenpoint, near McGolrick Park, sits directly on top of the Meeker Avenue Plumes which releases the vapors of carcinogenic dry cleaning chemicals into the homes of residents. That all sucks!

It seems contradictory to be living in a very toxic place and at the same time celebrate so many eco-friendly things. It’s like eating organic kale in one hand and smoking a cigarette in the other hand.

So what is the point?

Photo: Bill Rhodes

The point is, we live here and we love it!  And we can’t just give up on Greenpoint. Generations ahead of us will call this place home and it’s important we make sure it is cleaner and healthier for them and safe for us in the meantime.

Instead of being cynical about all of these exciting “green” developments in the community, embrace them and look at them as steps towards cleaning up Greenpoint.

A very important panel discussion called Is Greenpoint Safe? was held at Anella recently. Organizers created this important document to help you become more informed and understand how you can get involved, get educated and get Greenpoint on the right track.

A few important things to note: The Newtown Creek is a Superfund Site, if you live above or near the Meeker Ave plumes it’s important to get your home tested right away for harmful fumes, oil spills and bad odors are cause for action, houseplants can help improve air quality in your home, eating food from your garden may be contaminated with lead or other toxic chemical so test the soil, and composting, limiting the use of harmful cleaners in your home and adopting a tree are all ways you can directly act towards making Greenpoint a cleaner and healthier place.

Please discuss and share this information with friends and neighbors.

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Superfunding The Newtown Creek

Over a year ago, on September 27, 2010, the EPA opened a new chapter on the ongoing saga of our polluted waterway by designating the Newtown Creek a federally recognized Superfund Site. This program, which allocates federal money towards research and remediation and aggressively pursues polluters for subsequent remuneration, is contentious because it carries a powerful stigma; however, being on the Superfund list provides our neighborhood with powerful tools for improvement.

A year later, on October 25th, the EPA invited members of the public to an information session to educate locals on the upcoming plans for the creek.  At the meeting I was told to keep an eye on the website, where data and announcements will be made public.   Officials also informed me that studies into the physical geography of the waterway are set to begin next spring, including bathymetry to determine the exact geometry of the waterway and acoustic studies to find sunken obstructions, among others.

Following these will be chemical analyses to determine the exact nature of the contamination and identify areas that may still be leaching pollutants into the waterway.  Interestingly – perhaps suspiciously – these studies will be conducted by firms hired and paid for by the polluters themselves, though this will of course be under EPA scrutiny and direction.

Perhaps the most interesting information I learned was that this process involves coming up with a general cost for the pre-remediation studies – in this case, 25 million dollars for the studies alone, only 5 million short of what the entire remediation effort costs at the average Superfund site – and then leaving it up to the identified polluters to decide amongst themselves who is responsible for what portion of that cost and to fund the studies themselves.  The degree to which individual companies are held financially responsible is based in part on their contributions to the pollution and in part on their ability to pay; the EPA avoids bankrupting companies in pursuing remediation funding.

This is a long process, and we shouldn’t expect remediation to begin for at least 5-7 years.  I was told – hesitantly, and in no uncertain terms that this was only the widest of estimates – that the cost of remediation would be around 500 million at the absolute minimum.  Ours is what the EPA terms a regional “megasite” due to the nature, extent, and history of contamination.  It’s a dubious honor, to be sure.

This process will prove pivotal to the future of our neighborhood, so be sure to keep a close eye on the EPA website for updates and future public meetings.  If you have additional questions, contact these EPA representatives for more information:

Caroline Kwan-Appelman
Remedial Project Manager – General questions
Phone: (212) 637-4275

Michael A. Mintzer
Assistant Regional Counsel – Legal questions
Phone:  (212) 637-3168

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