mta

Speed Metal Speed Dating & the G Train Shocker — The Hook-Up 4/8

Photo via Nicole Disser, Bedford + Bowery
Photo via Nicole Disser, Bedford + Bowery
What are you doing next Saturday? If you can stomach planning more than two days ahead, come help clean up the neighborhood with Curb Your Litter and NAG on April 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. If you like your environmentalism with a touch of interactive data, check out this cool map.
 
What are you doing this Sunday, actually? If you’re single and metal as hell, come to Speed Metal Speed Dating at St. Vitus. This, from the same people who brought you Morrissey-themed speed dating night at Black Rabbit.
 
Transparency could soon be imposed upon the film industry thanks to a bill sponsored by Councilman Stephen Levin, which would require the city to provide monthly reports detailing when and where filming goes down (as well as the companies involved).
 
Via MTA
Via MTA

Do we smell another passive-aggressive Cuomo/de Blasio standoff? A state audit found that the MTA fudges its numbers on how often subway trains show up on time, and that service sucked more in 2015 than it did in 2014. But wait! Want to know the real shocker? The G Train performed better than any other line in terms of meeting target wait times: a rate of 81.3%.

The Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce is teaming up with the Greenpoint Chamber of Commerce, allowing all BCC programs to trickle down to GPC members.
 
Have you met the North Brooklyn Democratic District Leader? He can serve you a drink at 151 on the Lower East Side, where he tends bar.
 
Jonesing for a tree? You have until May 5 to register for the Greening Greenpoint Tree Giveaway. It’s free! And it’s a tree!
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The New Waterfront Trolley: Is it Money Well-Spent?

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One reader responded to a recent post on the problems involved in building a bridge over Newtown Creek, suggesting that the article was too negative toward the project and that no infrastructure would ever be built if people only saw the inherent flaws — certainly a valid viewpoint.

However, before we begin a new multi-billion dollar project, we need to evaluate the time, expense and displacement it will create and decide if those billions of dollars might be better spent on subways or other existing forms of mass transportation. The city says that the streetcar will be ready in 2024, but critics feel this is a wildly optimistic timeframe.

John Orcutt, a streetcar critic and spokesman for Transit Center, a non-profit public transportation advocate group, stated, “The biggest concern is these kinds of transit projects haven’t performed well and have been difficult to implement.”

Washington D.C experienced years of delay and large cost overruns on a much smaller streetcar line, and the New York plan is far bigger than what any other American cities have recently built. The de Blasio administration envisions 30 stops over a 16-mile route and 60 streetcar vehicles. The very scope of the project almost ensures many more years of delay than Washington’s tiny system.

Another issue that many have with the streetcar is that in a city already short on parking, the rail line would eliminate hundreds of parking spots, so that drivers all along the route would be vehement enemies. It is hard to imagine City Council members backing a plan that would draw the ire of their driving constituents, especially if they never take the streetcar line.
Screen shot 2016-02-29 at 10.03.41 PM
It is still not clear if the streetcar would be woven into the subway system or if it would be an independent system. There is also the huge question of whether the system would honor MetroCards. It is hard to imagine that many riders who already pay a lot for public transportation would shell out even more money for the tram if the streetcar fare costs extra. A limited ridership would mean that the billion-dollar cost of the streetcar cannot be justified.

There is one other problem with bridges: bureaucracy. Besides the time and expense of constructing a bridge, building spans today mandates conducting long and costly environmental impact studies that could take years and push back the 2024 date even further into the future. Let’s not even begin to contemplate the delays legal challenges to the light rail line would create.

Perhaps the more than $2 billion earmarked for the trolley could be better spent on a renovation of the inadequate G line. Certainly improvements to the G would have a greater impact on the local transportation situation in the near future. Clearly, the city needs to explain how the plan for the streetcar is more positive for Greenpoint than a subway overhaul.

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Every Story Is About Congestion & Change — The Hook-Up 3/4

Photo via Lore Croghan, Brooklyn Eagle
Photo via Lore Croghan, Brooklyn Eagle
In January, Assemblyman Lentol announced a temporary suspension of alternate side parking rules on film shoot days, but that hasn’t stopped film crews from competing for space with residents (hearsay is that the production crew of “Tiara” blocked off a G Train entrance during rush hour). Well, if you ever wanted a quantifiable look at just how movie-famous our neighborhood is, here’s an interactive map.
 
Subway slashings have officially landed on the G Line (well, it happened once, but still). Now, police are looking to amp up NYPD presence on the trains at night.
 
You may have heard about plans to reevaluate the Meeker Avenue crossing, but the rather congested North Brooklyn is going to be the subject of a larger, more comprehensive transportation study.

Continue reading

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A Streetcar Named Whose Desire, Exactly? — The Hook-Up 2/12

Photo: Friends of the Brooklyn Queens Connector
Photo: Friends of the Brooklyn Queens Connector

Is it the Streetcar Named Desire for the people of New York, or is de Blasio’s proposed streetcar linking Brooklyn and Queens a developer’s fantasy in the making? In either case, here’s what we know so far.

We know slightly more about the L Train Shutdown than we did last week. Brace yourselves, because it seems as though “1 year vs. 3 years” was a generous estimate.

It only took a year, but the reports from the CitiStorage fire investigation have been wrested into public view by The Brooklyn Paper. The fire was allegedly sparked by a light fixture, subdued, and then reignited. Kind of weird that department reps maintained their line that the investigation was ongoing, even though investigators signed off on the report on Jan. 8. Continue reading

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You’ve Heard About the L-Pocalypse. What About the G-Pocalypse?

greenpointg16
Photo: Jeremiah Cox

The L Train is facing an imminent, extensive shutdown in the wake of lingering Hurricane Sandy damage, and North Brooklyn hasn’t taken the news very well.

And why would it, given the amount of daily riders who travel through the Canarsie Tube every day — around 350,000 — not to mention the huge impact ridership has on local businesses?

Currently, the MTA is considering two options to implement as early as 2017: to close the entire tunnel nonstop for one year, or to leave one side open and reduce traffic to half-volume, which would take anywhere from three to four years.

Not ones to bide their time quietly, a number of local residents and business owners have already formed The L Train Coalition to demand a better solution from the MTA, though many know full well that the answer will definitely be “pain.”

Pain, of course, can be abstract or painted in sharp relief. And while a fair amount of ink has been spilled over the implications for L Train commuters, there are fewer educated guesses regarding the fate of surrounding areas like Greenpoint, which will absorb a great deal of shock from the closure as riders scramble to find alternative routes. Continue reading

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Word on the Curb: Ticketing blitz, Brazen Burglars, and more!

Hey, hey Greenpoint! We’re already three weeks into 2015 and a lot has gone down,  some of it good, some of it ugly, and some of it downright funny. In the spirit of community, Greenpointers is happy to announce the addition of Word on the Curb—the latest source of juicy gossip lifted off the street and out of your lips.

So without further adieu, let’s tackle some issues plaguing Greenpointers these days:    Continue reading

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G Train is back on track.

Photo credit Kim M

Five weeks ago, we all bemoaned the G Train closure and the anxious questions that came along with it: How are we going to get around? Will that damn Ferry be up and running? Where the hell did I put the air pump for my bike tires? After an August of shuttle buses, long lines, and traffic, all the bitching has come to an end. The G train is finally restored.

When Sandy hit we all knew it was going to be bad for our subway tunnels. Millions of salt water and copper wires made fore a corrosive mess; our G line was one of the hardest hit tunnels in the system. So while we were being shepherded over the Pulsaki Bridge and down Manhattan Ave in air-conditioned shuttle buses, which some seemed to prefer,  crews of MTA workers repaired tracks and switches. The whopping total for fast track repairs in a post-Sandy NYC came out $80 million dollars.
Continue reading

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The G Trains “stuGGLe” Begins Friday (7/25) for an entire month! Tell Us Your G Train Story

We Can All Relate

Dear Greenpointers,

There is no funny or cheerful way to put this. There will be no G train service between Nassau Ave and Court Square in Queens from Friday, June 25th (at 10:30pm) through Tuesday September 2nd (5am). Service operates between Church Ave and Nassau Ave.

There will be free shuttle buses providing service at all times. Manhattan Ave shuttle buses run between Nassau Ave and Court Sq, stopping at Greenpoint Ave and 21 St. McGuinness Blvd shuttle buses run between Lorimer St and Court Sq, stopping near stations at Nassau Ave, Greenpoint Ave and 21 St. Continue reading

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The G Train Gets a Bandaid

Free Transfer Between the G and the JM at Broadway/Lorimer

We’ve been pretty concerned lately about the looming black hole of public transit that will be Greenpoint this Summer. As you may remember, we found out back in March that the G will be suspended for 5 weeks (July 26th through Sept. 1), between Nassau and LIC,  due to Sandy-related repairs under Newtown Creek. In addition, the India Street ferry doesn’t seem any closer to being repaired, leaving Greenpointers to depend on shuttle busses for their commutes during the month of August.

Today it seems that the city has figured out at least one solution to ease the pain… well “solution” is a strong word, so let’s just say they put a half-hearted bandaid on it. During the G closure, riders will be able to transfer to the JM train at the Broadway G stop. According to the Daily News, the new system will allow riders to exit the G at Broadway and walk a few blocks to the J/M stop at Lorimer for a free transfer. That’s nice for people who live near the Broadway G stop or further south along the G and need an efficient way to get to Midtown (those who would normally take the G to Court Square), but there’s still a major hole in the system: how do people who live near in North Greenpoint get to Broadway if they have no access to the G?? Continue reading

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Cafe Grumpy is Killing It, One Starbucks at a Time

Grumpy Starbucks

It’s pretty cool when a local business beats out a chain, so we have to give some props to Cafe Grumpy, which will be taking over the Starbucks location on the east side of Grand Central.  Sources told the Huffington Post that Starbucks’ lease was up and apparently the the MTA has a policy of not allowing big chain stores to apply for a new one.  “It’s part of our effort to keep the space unique,” an MTA spokesperson said. Continue reading

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